Whether it be from just generally being awesome or for research into the early history of the universe, it’s a hot time for Berkeley professors to get their 15 minutes.

Two Berkeley physics professors, George Smoot and Paul Richards, recently won awards for their contributions to physics teaching and research, respectively.

Richards’ work included organizing MAXIMA, or the “Millimeter Anisotropy eXperiment IMaging Array” (naturally), and figuring out the geometry of the universe is basically Euclidean. Good news, guys, the Pythagorean theorem still works!

Smoot received the Oersted Medal, awarded by the American Association of Physics Teachers, and comes with $10,000. Along with two other researchers, Richards shares the Dan David Prize and the $1 million that comes with it.

We take our invisible-yet-quite-massive dark matter hats off to you, gentlemen.

Paul Richards, George Smoot honored for astrophysics research and teaching [NewsCenter]



Comments:
Ilya Stavinsky said:
Feb 25, 2009 at 6:28 am

“Richards’ work included organizing MAXIMA, or the “Millimeter Anisotropy eXperiment IMaging Array” (naturally), and figuring out the geometry of the universe is basically Euclidean. Good news, guys, the Pythagorean theorem still works!”
Richards conclusion about geometry of our universe is completely wrong. It contradicts to fundamental laws of classical philosophy and the way we aquire knowledge about nature. Read my article: “Formal and dialectical logic as unity of opposites or development of classical philosophy”
http://sites.google.com/site/socialcapital1/Home
In relation to this subject another my article “Why classical mechanics limited” will contribute clarity in that matter.
http://sites.google.com/site/socialcapital1/Home/classicalmecanicscontradictions



adfadsf said:
Feb 25, 2009 at 8:24 pm

O’ la la