schawrz

Well, something worked. After a tumultuous year of panic, protests and flaming Mark Yudof effigies (it probably happened), Schwarzenegger has finally promised a substantial return of funding to California’s higher education system.

Specifically, he announced that he will not sign the 2010-2011 state budget unless it includes the return of over $848 million to the UC, CSU and community college systems, a proposal he made in January. Nor will he sign it if it does not include a Cal Grant financial aid program.

Thanks.

Image Source: d vdm under Creative Commons
Budget without proposed funds won’t be signed [UC Newsroom]
State Focuses on Higher Education to Ensure Future Economic Success [Daily Cal]



Comments:
Berkeley Berkeley said:
May 5, 2010 at 2:32 pm

Yay?



Transparency said:
Jun 21, 2010 at 9:19 pm

Yudof’s UCB Chancellor Birgeneau Loss of Credibility, Trust
The UCB budget gap has grown to $150 million, and still the Chancellor is spending money that isn’t there on expensive outside consultants. His reasons range from the need for impartiality to requiring the “innovative thinking, expertise, and new knowledge” the consultants would bring.

Does this mean that the faculty and management of a world-class research and teaching institution lack the knowledge, impartiality, innovation, and professionalism to come up with solutions? Have they been fudging their research for years? The consultants will glean their recommendations from interviewing faculty and the UCB management that hired them; yet solutions could be found internally if the Chancellor were doing the job HE was hired to do. Consultant fees would be far better spent on meeting the needs of students.

There can be only one conclusion as to why creative solutions have not been forthcoming from the professionals within UCB: Chancellor Birgeneau has lost credibility and the trust of the faculty as well as of the Academic Senate leadership that represents them. Even if the faculty agrees with the consultants’ recommendations – disagreeing might put their jobs in jeopardy – the underlying problem of lost credibility and trust will remain.