3540679071_3ae4eaf5b9Disclaimer: The content of this post is derived from a source that includes somewhat alarming nudity and (probably) inadvertent hilarity. In other words, it just might make your day.

Christmas Nipples, friends. Let those two words settle gingerly into your active imaginations. Then, bearing them in mind, try this sentence on for size:

AIYU is a pronoun which refers to the I in you and the you in me and that both you and I are part of the All That Is and it is the All That Is that is the Oneness that we share.

Confused? Excellent. You’ve been thus introduced to Veenaa Saynana Laughing Dolphin. On Dec. 17, 2010, at the Art House Gallery at 2905 Shattuck, she and other artists will be hosting “Four Performances exploring themes of Christmas, Excess, Breast Mania, Nipples, The Milk of Human Kindness and Eros, Sensual Love.”

Nakedness will abound.

And “light refreshments will be served.”

Win, win and epic win.

Image Source: Joana Roja under Creative Commons
Veenaa Saynana Events [site]
Earlier: Be the Next Big Thing


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If you find yourself shopping for gifts this year (and let’s face it, most of us do) you might be in the classic Christmas/Hanukkah/Kwanzaa/nondenominational winter holiday quandary: what do you get the people in your life? Scarves are safe, CDs and books are dangerous and gift cards are just too impersonal. If you’re looking for something Berkeley-esque, however, look no further: the ASUC Art Studio is currently hosting a holiday art sale.

The art sale is in the MLK building from Nov. 30 (today) until Dec. 4 from 11 a.m. – 5 p.m. (closes at 3 p.m. on Dec. 4). Little more information is provided, although they do advertise things that are both “handmade and original.” We don’t know exactly what type of art, either, but they’re taking classes on ceramics, drawing and painting and photography, so it’s sure to be a blend.

And it’s Berkeley, so there may very well be anti-capitalist motifs. As we all know, that’s perfect for Yuletide.

Image source: geishaboy500 under Creative Commons
Holiday Sale [Berkeley Art Studio]


moneys
Ever feel like some people can pick up on your emotions without you even saying a word? Well it may just be that this person’s ability to read emotions is related to their socioeconomic status.

According to a study published in the November issue of “Psychological Science,” people of lower socioeconomic status are better at reading emotions than those of high socieconomic status. Michael Kraus, co-author of the study and postdoctoral researcher at UCSF (Berkeley researchers also contributed), claims that the higher level of empathy amongst those of low read more »


as a bat

Sure, you might be thinking about that first time you fell in love and all the world was rosy and perfect and beautiful, but that’s not what we meant. We meant blind in the literal sense. Like Carol, who never wore her safety goggles. That kind of blind.

Why are we rambling on about this?

Because an unfortunate and anonymous individual somewhere in the ether seems to suffer temporary blindness every time he, well, you know … gets a little lovin’.  And since Berkeley PhD students are too busy acquiring an education and all that good shiznit to be getting some lovin’ of their own, we weren’t surprised to find out that it was two Berkeley MCB PhD kids who unearthed this gem of a story … and promptly put it up on their blog. (Oh, the thrills of living vicariously through the online medical community.)

Turns out that the poor sometimes-blind soul our blogger buddies made semi-famous has been suffering from vasoconstriction (muscle-induced narrowing of the body’s blood vessels), and it is this malady that is responsible his bedroom blindness. Lucky for him, some doctor s figured all this out pretty quickly, gave him a dose of something magical, restored his sight and made all the world rosy again. This time for reals.

Image Source: Stacy Lynn Baum under Creative Commons
Man Goes Blind From Having Sex [Fox News]


welcomehome


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As anyone who has taken Astro C10 knows, (and yeah, that’s probably most Berkeley students) the solar system is really cool. Just ask anyone: new stuff shows up on planets all the time. For example, a brown stripe that had disappeared on Jupiter is now back.

We’ll leave the technical jargon to the people who, you know, actually know stuff, but we are still able to coo in awe at this discovery. An amateur astronomer noticed the stripe’s reappearance and UC Berkeley profs read more »


We found this flyer on a bike rack near Moffitt Library.

“Fight back against the recent upsurge of ridiculous bike citations by UCPD on campus! This is an act of civil disobedience.”

“WE WILL BIKE THROUGH CAMPUS. WE WILL NOT DISMOUNT. WE WILL NOT IDENTIFY OURSELVES FOR ANOTHER BULLSHIT TICKET. WE WILL NOT BE INTIMIDATED.”

Apparently all bicyclists are supposed to meet at noon on Tuesday at Bancroft and Telegraph. Prepare to be sideswiped.

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Image Source: Jae Park
Earlier: Yarn Bomb in Golden Gate Park


These are your dad's <strike>transistors</strike> vacuum tubes.

These are your dad's transistors vacuum tubes.

Last week, while all of us normal folk were preparing to indulge in obscene amounts of Thanksgiving feast, “ultra-thin” was probably the last word on our minds. But that was not the case for researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, who were paving the way for the future of electronics by “(integrating) ultra-thin layers of the semiconductor indium arsenide onto a silicon substrate to create a nanoscale transistor.” Said transistor — a product of a process at once baffling and incomprehensible to laymen — exhibits “excellent electronic properties,” offering levels of performance much higher than those of existing silicon-based technologies.

The LBL research team, lead by faculty scientist Ali Javey, were searching for alternative semiconductors to overcome the limitations of silicon. Indium aresenide proved to be an ideal candidate, and the devices read more »


After discovering the latest omen of the world’s coming demise, the Clog encourages Berkeley students to put down their books and enjoy their short-lived time on Earth.

Yup, prepare to put on your sad-caps because director Melanie Mayron is coming out with a sequel to one of the finest teenage high-school movies of our generation, and it’s called “Mean girls 2.”

Agh, it’s painful to the fingers to type it. The movie simply cannot be topped, especially by some straight-to-DVD wannabe film with an unknown cast — except for you, Tim Meadows. Wtf are you doing in there, you are breaking our hearts!!

In the new film the “Anti-Plastics” try and bring down the Plastics. Didn’t all the plastics-related drama get resolved at the end of the first film? We hope this obvious commercial exploitation of a movie that was perfectly perfect as it was will not taint your original love for “Mean Girls.”

Earlier: Like, OMG, the Science Guy Just Collapsed
Mean Girls 2 Official Trailer [YouTube]


car
Sorry, football fans, but it looks as if this Saturday’s game against Washington will be the last in Berkeley’s Memorial Stadium until 2012 football season. The culprit is, unsurprisingly, earthquake renovation and seismic-retrofit.

The 2011 season, then, will have all its games in San Francisco at the San Francisco Giants’ AT&T Park. Besides the fact that it is a mission to get to, the relocation of games means a major loss of business for a lot of restaurants and hotels in Berkeley.

With this in mind, envisioning next year’s football games is sort of difficult — not that we were all that involved with football in the first place. But really, how are all the football shenanigans going to go down? Will students still head over to the frats or whatnot for pre-gaming then drunkenly invade the BART by the thousands before somehow finally making it home? Football games are exhausting enough as it is! Luckily this situation only lasts one season, and will make later visits to Memorial Stadium a lot safer.

We can power through this, Bears!

Image Source: CarbonNYC under Creative Commons
Last home game until 2012 poses economic questions [Berkeleyside]


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