San Francisco awoke last week with too many layers on our faces and too little on our body. Collars, choke chains, whips and public urination all made our weekend at Folsom Street Fair exhausting.

Surprisingly, NOT a Roman Cosplay event.
Surprisingly, not a Roman Cosplay event.

At the crack of dawn, and at the crack of a whip, Sunday began what is known as the  “the world’s largest leather and fetish event.” Spectators flocked from around the nation to see what some call the world’s largest hub of “sin, sex and spanking.” Folsom Street Fair is held on the last Sunday of every September on, well, Folsom Street. Despite the enormous and obvious presence, unsuspecting tourists were in for a surprise when their snapshots were tainted with cum-shots and taints. Participants wore everything from full latex suits to nothing but brotherly love and pride. read more »


There are easily thousands of bikes on campus. Any point during the day there are hundreds of bikes locked up at different locations from Sproul and Dwinelle to Moffit and Barrows just to name a few. According to the UCPD there have already been 67 bikes stolen this semester alone and that’s only the number of stolen bikes that have been reported. Bike robbery is a real problem in urban settings like that of UC Berkeley. If you use a bike to get around there is already a risk that it will be stolen. However there a couple steps you can take to help protect your bike.
Register your bike
Seriously, just do it. It only takes a moment, it’s free and it will ensure your bike comes right back to you if it is recovered by the police. Only 1,100 bikes have been registered this semester so if you haven’t registered your bike yet, now is the perfect time. You can register your bike any day of the week from 6 pm. from 9 p.m. at the UCPD front counter in the basement of Sproul Hall. You will need to bring your bike and your ID. After that a friendly CSO will help you fill out the form to get your Bike License. You’ll put two stickers on your bike frame and that’s it, you’re done. Should anything happen to your bike and the police find it, you’ll have your bike home hassle free.
Properly Locking Techniques
The other way to protect your bike is to properly lock it. Locking just your front tire to a pole is a good way to only have a front tire when you return. Using a U-Lock is the best, cable locks are too easy to cut. A common rule a thumb is that a thief is going to go for the bike that looks easiest to steal so every extra step you take to secure your bike is ideal. If you can, carry a second U-Lock or cable so you can secure both of your tires as well as your frame. Use your lock to secure the back tire to the pole through triangle the back of the frame forms, (this will secure the tire as well as the frame). We’re securing the back tire with the U-Lock because it is worth more than the front tire. Then loop the cable through your  front tire and attach to the U-Lock before you close the lock. If you’re using a second U-Lock instead then use it to secure your front tire to your frame.
If someone really wants to steal your bike they will. However most thieves will look for easier picking if you take these steps to properly lock your bike. And if your bike is registered, it has a much greater chancea of making its way back to you.

A properly locked bike

There are easily thousands of bikes on campus. Any point during the day there are hundreds of bikes locked up at different locations from Sproul and Dwinelle to Moffitt and Barrows, just to name a few. According to the UCPD there have already been 67 bikes stolen this semester alone. That’s quite a few and doesn’t include the bike thefts that haven’t been reported. Bike robbery is a real problem in urban settings like that of UC Berkeley. If you use a bike to get around, there is a decent chance that it will be stolen. However, there a couple steps you can take to help protect your bike. read more »


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Still recovering from midterms?  We are too, and nothing sounds better than a movie marathon. Well, you’re in luck…

The self-proclaimed “Words Largest Student Film Festival” is collaborating with SUPERB again this year to bring you the best short films Berkeley students have to offer. The Campus Moviefest lends students from over 90 schools computers, cameras and equipment to make their own short films. They are given one week to write, film, direct and edit their masterpieces.

Don’t miss the extravaganza TONIGHT at 7 p.m. in Wheeler Auditorium for a screening of the top 16 short films made by Cal students. It’s $3 with your Cal ID, $5 for general admission.

Prizes for Best Picture, Best Drama and Best Comedy will be awarded to contestants tonight, voted on by students! So shake off your crazy week of tests and papers, dress to the nines and get ready to vote for the best of the best.

Image source: lenovophotolibrary under Creative Commons.


Who's a big boy?

"Who's a big boy?"

The Endeavour space shuttle fly-over the bay last Friday was super exciting. Not man on the moon exciting, but still pretty impressive. It was a relic of ancient times piggybacking on a plane. And by ancient times, we mean 20 years ago. Seeing the colossus made us think: when will we see the Endeavour of our generation?

Endeavour was the last space shuttle built by NASA. It is from a bygone era of government dedication to space exploration and science. The space program was the epitome of blatantly inefficient spending, and yet, it was one of the greatest uses of money. It captured the imaginations of millions and inspired innovation in laboratories across the globe. It led to the creation of new polymers and telecommunications devices. It took away some of the mystery of the big blue sky. But most importantly, it led kindergartners to draw spaceships with crayons and made them dream of becoming astronauts.

Now we have the opportunity to take to the heavens again. Mars is our frontier. When the space program was closed — back in 2011 — the Investor’s Business Daily poll showed that 56% of Americans opposed the ending of the manned space exploration program. So of course, the lovely people in charge closed the program. read more »


268149161_b370a426ed_oIt’s time to ‘fess up, guys. No one actually checks their Facebook invites anymore, do they? We see the notification, get a little bit giddy, and then frown just a little bit when we realize it’s not a “like” on that latest photo we posted of our breakfast cereal a la almond milk and banana slices.

However, sometimes it could just do some good to check the event invites more closely, even if we have to wade through the multiple club meetings and sponsorship spams. In fact, there may be hidden gems such as the Willard Park Clothing Swap buried deep beneath all those frat parties and grilled cheese sales.

Hosted by Ruby Lee and friends TODAY from 5 p.m. to 8p.m. at Willard Park (snuggled in between Regent Avenue, Hillegass Avenue, and Dana Street), the clothing swap is meant to channel the free piles at the co-ops.

Essentially, you just bring a bunch of clothes that you don’t want, have been trying to donate, planned on burning anyway, etc. and let people take what they feel like. The trade-off is that you get to browse other people’s free piles and grab what you want, too! For goods that are more expensive, one-on-one trades are allowed and even encouraged. read more »


UC Men's OctetSproul has fallen into its rhythm, which includes — you guessed it — our beloved a capella groups. If you haven’t already, we’re sure you’ll fall in love with the campus fad no matter which performance you manage to catch in front of Sather Gate. The semester is showcasing a host of new talent, now that groups have selected their newbies, but it’s also shaking up what we’ve gotten used to over the years

UC Men’s Octet, just eight of the campus’ singing celebrities, is comprised almost entirely of new members this year. This fresh ensemble promises to delight just as much as the old, practicing ten hours a week to learn the group’s old songs as well as new ones. They even have to put extra effort into presentation. After all, those snazzy suits we see them in during large concerts don’t grow on trees. With that much work, they’re sure to find their unique sound sooner rather than later. They’ll be jumping on each other and making obscene jokes before we know it, if they haven’t started already.

If you miss some of your favorite Octets, watch out for them in neighboring groups! Jeff Nathan has transferred from the Octet into the coed cape-wearing group Decadence, and Patrick Wong has joined the coed group Artists in Resonance. Each wanted to expand their a capella experience here at Cal, moving from an all-guys group to slightly different dynamics.

If we’ve managed to bring you out of the a capella-loving closet but you have no idea where to listen in on their free concerts, we have the answers! You can plan out a week-long extravaganza.

Artists in Resonance: Mondays at 12:00 p.m.

Decadence: Wednesdays at 12:00 p.m.

UC Men’s Octet: Wednesdays at 1:00 p.m.

Drawn to Scale: Fridays at 12:00 p.m.

California Golden Overtones: Fridays at 1:00 p.m.

Noteworthy: Fridays at 2:00 p.m.

As these artists say every performance, go Bears!

Image source: Erum Khan, Daily Cal


How To Not Get Called On (1)After a summer in which we’ve emptied our heads of all relevant material, the first few weeks of school can get pretty… well, awkward. And I’m not just talking about your inability to make pointless small talk or find new friends. Nah, it’s way more weird when your professor asks a question to a lecture hall of 500 people, and you shuffle around uncomfortably until the professor moves on to something else and the Adjustment Bureau wipes the minds of everyone in the room.

At some point during the hour-and-a-half lecture — minus that crucial ten minutes of Berkeley time, of course — the professor is going to want some answers out of your hung over, fried brains. Being smart, he or she is going to see the look on your petrified face that screams, “don’t call on me!” And being the academics they are, they call on you. It’s a constant back and forth game between students and professors. And the object is to knock them out of the game. read more »


Some people swear by the power nap, others simply call it a myth. The power nap is traditionally thought of as an afternoon nap that lasts somewhere between fifteen and thirty minutes. When done right, Power napping has numerous benefits. A power nap relieves stress and allows you to re-energize. You’ll also be more productive and alert when you return to work. According to Web MD (Dr. Web is a real doctor right?) there are few main keys to power napping.

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My_Neighbor_Totoro_-_Tonari_no_Totoro_(Movie_Poster)

We all remember that time in our childhoods when we stayed up watching classic, English-dubbed anime movies (on VHS!) from Studio Ghibli, such as “Kiki’s Delivery Service” (1989) and “My Neighbor Totoro” (1988) … and to our parent’s irritation, usually over and over again for weeks on end.

Years later, of course, we connected the dots and learned that one of our favorite films in particular, “Spirited Away” (2001), was in fact something of an elaborate metaphor and social commentary on the child brothels of Japan, but that’s another story. Actually, we’ve created an extensively detailed infographic to illustrate how we think you should feel about this, in case you’re interested.

In any case, we still love a good dose of nostalgia. We’re very excited to remind all of our fellow Studio Ghibli movie fans that the Berkeley California Theatre’s Ghibli marathon has been extended another week! The theater will continue these one-time reruns of classic Ghibli films only until the first week of October, so take advantage of the pre-midterm lull while you still can.

Here are the new showtimes: read more »


P1020741Itching to hop on a plane and see new sights, perhaps while earning a few credits? Well, the Daily Clog checked out the Study Abroad fair held last Friday Sept. 21 and has all the updates you need on such academic adventures.
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