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Name: GO SMS Pro

Platform(s): Android

Price: Free

Mission: Make texting fun for Android

To be blunt, the stock SMS app for Android is boring and short on features. It sends your texts and that’s about it. Compared to iMessage, the stock SMS app looks a plain No. 2 pencil.

Android users deserve more.

They deserve a powerful app packed full of extra functionality. They deserve pop-up quick reply boxes and the ability to put a password on their SMS app to keep their nosy friends out of their business! They deserve themes to keep things festive and, perhaps most importantly, EMOJI because they deserve to have some fun too.

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2012-09-17 18.20.19

We at the Clog, like most, were ecstatic to leave the disaster that is CalMail behind for bMail. However, now that most Cal students have been moved over to bMail, many are finding that their @berkeley.edu email no longer syncs to their smartphones. If you are one of those students, or want to set up sync for the first time, then we have some steps to get your bMail properly synced to your phone.

1. Migrate to bMail
If you haven’t actually migrated to bMail yet, do it! You’ll be moved over to the gorgeous Gmail environment which is faster, cleaner and easier to use. All your past email will be moved over to your new account, and your CalMail will stop receiving new mail.

2. Create a Google key for your bConnected account
With the new system, you’re going to need to create a Google Key to sync any of your bConnected apps. You will use this as your password instead of your CalNet password when you set up bMail to sync on your phone. To set up your Google Key, you’ll need to go to the “Manage my keys page.” Log in with your CalNet ID and then select “bApps (Google).” Select the “Set Key” button. At this point you will see a randomly generated password. You can accept this password by selecting “Set Key” again, or you can choose the “Define your own tab” and set your own key.

3. Sync bMail with your iPhone or Android (Skip to step four for other third-party clients)
We’re almost there. If you’re using the Gmail app on iPhone or Android then all you have to do is sign in with your full @berkeley.edu email address and enter your Google Key as the password. It’s also just as simple if you want to use the iPhone’s mail app. Go to setting and select mail. Add a new account and choose Gmail, and then log in as if you were using the Gmail app. Gmail should sync, and you now have bMail on your phone!

4. How to log in with a third-party client
All third-party clients are a little different, but here’s the information you’ll need. When asked to log in, be sure to use your Google Key, not your CalNet ID password. When you are asked to chose a retrieval Protocal choose IMAP, not pop3 (IMAP allows you to view your emails on multiple devices much easier than read more »


Name: Pocket
Platform(s): iOS, Android, Chrome, Firefox
Price: Free
Mission: Save online articles (and other media) to read later

College students are busy, probably more so than most people. We don’t have much free time between trying not to fall behind in our studies and perhaps working a bit to help relieve our crushing debt. A lot of us like to read but often don’t have the time. But if you happen to find some free time in your day (perhaps on the toliet), Pocket can have the online articles you’ve been meaning to read lined up and ready to go.

What makes Pocket a breeze to use is the browser extension for Firefox or Chrome. The app makes it effortless to save online content to read when ever you have a spare moment. When you see an article you would like to read later, just hit the Pocket button on your browser, and the article will be sent to the Pocket app your phone. It reformats your articles to show only the article itself using a simple black font that is easy on the eyes. And if you prefer reading in this clutter-free environment, you can do it on your computer as well with Pocket’s Web app.

The app also makes it extremely easy to organize your articles. You can make tags of your choosing to put your articles into categories. You can also simply search for certain keywords or websites. And once you’ve read an article, you can mark it “read,” and it will be archived so it’s not causing clutter (but you can pull it up again later if you need it).

This alone is more than enough features. But if you’re the power-user type, Pocket is integrated with more than 323 apps. Some of the big names the app is integrated with include Twitter, Evernote and Flipboard.
Pocket makes catching up on your reading easy and elegant. It’s free and is waiting for you whenever you have a moment.

Image source: NS Newsflash under Creative Commons


Typing

For all you Android users lusting for the ability to send texts from your computer, the Mighty Text Android app and web app are a fantastic solution. You no longer have to lust for an iMessage like situation. Sure you could set up Google Voice, but it’s a hassle. You either have to get a new number or port your number to Google. Mighty Text only takes seconds to set up and it changes your life.

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We have all seen the notorious yet ubiquitous “Sent from my iPhone” signature, and perhaps it is not worth analyzing something so trivial. But we love analyzing everything, and therefore we’re going to analyze the meaning, usage and existence of the “Sent from my iPhone” signature. Android and BlackBerry users (if there are any still out there), worry not. You guys are included in this discussion as well.

Before we got smartphones, we used to look at these default smartphone signatures with a little bit of envy. “Oh look at so-and-so, s/he has a smartphone and can send emails.” We wished we were that cool. Then we got smartphones. We kept that signature in as a way to brag. “LOOK AT US PEOPLE, WE HAVE SMARTPHONES, HA!”

Signature then

Signature then

Apparently though, some people have legitimate reasons for keeping in the default email signatures: read more »


Don't Forget About AndroidWe all love our overpriced “i” products, but let’s make sure Apple’s little brother Android isn’t left out. When you’re not trying to simulate the droid sound with your voice and trying to rule the world with your phone like they do in the commercials, you might recall that it’s a phone. With apps. A rather smart cookie, your Droid has plenty to offer you besides a completely customizable home screen interface – take that, iPhone – but that’s off topic. Presenting the best and least expensive stuff in the Play Store for Cal students:

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social

Do you find yourself going to one too many weddings and bachelor parties? Isn’t looking for the respective photos on Facebook or Flickr annoying? Well, the Clog doesn’t find itself in these situations, but Capsule certainly thinks you do.

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sunday nightSunday Shout-Out picks out the week’s stories that simply slipped our minds.

With a new semester comes new classes that are always difficult to find. Knowing this, the fine people at this institution have come up with a much faster way to access your classes, campus maps and other goodies through your iPhone or — the far less superior and far more “overprivileged” – Android. Just type in http://m.berkeley.edu/courses/. [News Center]

Astronomers at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory discovered read more »



Be afraid. Be very afraid.

Be afraid. Be very afraid.

Android apps know more about you than you think. In fact, they know much more about you than they should.

That’s what Erika Chin, a UC Berkeley Computer Science graduate student, and fellow security researcher, Yekaterina Tsipenyuk O’Neil, reported at this year’s DEFCON. Over 30% of Android apps are “overprivileged,” they say, which means they have access to information that they don’t need to function.

But … we don’t mean to go all luddite on you now. We grew up on healthy diets of Nintendo and AIM, too.

On that note, nProgress just launched the new student-specific app, ntro, for UC Berkeley students, to facilitate quasi-serendipitous encounters that wouldn’t otherwise occur. App users can find others based on common interests. What that will mean is no more headaches over forming last-minute study groups, locating student group meetings or finding musicians to form highly successful Grammy-award-winning bands with … maybe.

Image source: MP4Nation
Def Con 19: Android apps ask for too much power [Consumer Reports]
Students experiment with new app [Daily Cal]