Don't Forget About AndroidWe all love our overpriced “i” products, but let’s make sure Apple’s little brother Android isn’t left out. When you’re not trying to simulate the droid sound with your voice and trying to rule the world with your phone like they do in the commercials, you might recall that it’s a phone. With apps. A rather smart cookie, your Droid has plenty to offer you besides a completely customizable home screen interface – take that, iPhone – but that’s off topic. Presenting the best and least expensive stuff in the Play Store for Cal students:

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Jeff Davis and the Carillon

Jeff Davis and the Carillon

It’s 11:30 a.m. on a Monday, and Jeff Davis is getting ready to play his second concert of the day to his audience nearly 300 feet below him.

Jeff is Cal’s University Carillonist and is responsible for most of the compositions heard from the Campanile. For those who do not know, a carillonist plays a carillon, which is a keyboard-like instrument attached to a variety of bells to create music.

We sat down with Jeff in his Sather Tower office to get the inside scoop on the man who makes life at Cal just a little bit more in tune. read more »


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On June 16 literary nerds across the world celebrate a little known holiday — June 16 is Bloomsday, a day that honors the famous author James Joyce’s masterpiece, Ulysses. Berkeley pays homage to this holiday (although summer school is never canceled which is baffling) by hosting a series of readings. read more »


4543932241_4256231ea9_zThe semester is winding down. The week ahead promises to be filled with procrastination and if you are graduating, reminiscing. You will be going to every restaurant, bar, or café in the Berkeley area in order to get all your Berkeley energies out before you pack up and head home (whether home means into your mother’s open arms, or to your new grad school landscape).

So, as we sign off on Berkeley life, we will be briefly re-living our first experiences at a few of Berkeley’s most unique cafés and bars. Maybe they will inspire you to visit them if you are yet to try them, or simply remind you to go back one last time.

First up is the Elmwood Cafe on College Ave. It is one of our all time favorites, and one not often visited because it is not just right across the street from campus. Enjoy! read more »


clog pic (tumblr)Admit it – you have, at one point or another in your career as a Cal student, had to run for the 51B before, been apathetic about the ASUC candidate platforms (even when they try to tell you all about it), and almost certainly have stealthily avoided flyers on Sproul. This and other classic Berkeley sentiments are captured in yet another GIF-tastic Tumblr site, yougotocal.tumblr.com.

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At the beginning of every Canadian’s American Dream is a cheesy song about California.

We’ve compiled a short and sweet playlist for all to enjoy: whether you are out-of-state/international and can empathize with this never-ending California fascination, or a born-and-raised, in need of a refreshing sense of appreciation for the Golden State. Running commentary, free of charge, is included. read more »


20120315_192608Emmanuel Witzthum, a Jewish artist, went from embassy to embassy trying to get in touch with different artists from different cultural backgrounds. When he reached the American embassy he was told “Sorry, we don’t support culture.” Oh god, our cowboy hats and spurs are showing as some old kranky guy yells from a bar, “We don’t take too kindly to your type…” Luckily, this image faded, or dissolved really, through Witzthum’s artistry.

On a Thursday night at the Magnes museum, another barrier was broken: the barrier between young students and old Jewish art enthusiasts. Everyone turned out for a chance to hear from the great Emmanuel Witzthum. He is a famous composer, violist, curator and lecturer, who is the artist behind the piece Dissolving Localities (details here). It is a mix of sounds, and sites from Berkeley and Jerusalem that is a pleasure for the senses. This night was particuarly special because we got to see how this masterpiece was created. read more »


ImageStudents frantically whipped out their smartphones and dreaded what they inevitably saw this morning on the weeklong news forecast: a straight week of rain. Not like the poor folks up in the Pacific Northwest deal with it every day for the entire season or anything. Nevertheless, the Sproul walk was still a sea of umbrellas and grumpy students today … and now, here’s to another week of it.

As the hiatus from sunshine continues, let’s talk rain gear. If you’re a female college student, it’s safe to assume 95 percent of you were ecstatic to finally wear your rain boots in a non-ironic fashion. As for the general population, most of you dug around for your umbrellas, in which case your rainy day experiences correspond to one of the following types of umbrellas:

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5731102289_5c25ee9523We went to the famous Magnes exhibit put on by the Bancroft library knowing very little about Jewish art. For some reason we imagined we would find Old Testament scrolls, archaic headdresses, clay jars ready to crumble and other ancient pricey pieces of biblical proportions, but nothing that would be relevant to today’s fast-paced, iphone based, ADD lifestyle. However, we are guilty of blaspheme because this exhibit would pique the interest of even the 10 statuses daily Facebook addict.

At the back of the exhibition room is a lonely door and once we entered it, our ears were the first to transition into a strange world. read more »


Joseph Kony and his child soldiers took up Facebook by a storm the other night when Invisible Children’s eleventh documentary entitled “Kony 2012” began popping up on everyone’s Newsfeeds. We were intrigued by the ubiquity of the 29 minute (and 59 second) video (does anyone really have time for that?) that has already garnered 11 million views on YouTube alone, and decided to spend some quality time procrastinating for a cause instead of doing homework (that’s much better than regular procrastination, right?). read more »


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