There are easily thousands of bikes on campus. Any point during the day there are hundreds of bikes locked up at different locations from Sproul and Dwinelle to Moffit and Barrows just to name a few. According to the UCPD there have already been 67 bikes stolen this semester alone and that’s only the number of stolen bikes that have been reported. Bike robbery is a real problem in urban settings like that of UC Berkeley. If you use a bike to get around there is already a risk that it will be stolen. However there a couple steps you can take to help protect your bike.
Register your bike
Seriously, just do it. It only takes a moment, it’s free and it will ensure your bike comes right back to you if it is recovered by the police. Only 1,100 bikes have been registered this semester so if you haven’t registered your bike yet, now is the perfect time. You can register your bike any day of the week from 6 pm. from 9 p.m. at the UCPD front counter in the basement of Sproul Hall. You will need to bring your bike and your ID. After that a friendly CSO will help you fill out the form to get your Bike License. You’ll put two stickers on your bike frame and that’s it, you’re done. Should anything happen to your bike and the police find it, you’ll have your bike home hassle free.
Properly Locking Techniques
The other way to protect your bike is to properly lock it. Locking just your front tire to a pole is a good way to only have a front tire when you return. Using a U-Lock is the best, cable locks are too easy to cut. A common rule a thumb is that a thief is going to go for the bike that looks easiest to steal so every extra step you take to secure your bike is ideal. If you can, carry a second U-Lock or cable so you can secure both of your tires as well as your frame. Use your lock to secure the back tire to the pole through triangle the back of the frame forms, (this will secure the tire as well as the frame). We’re securing the back tire with the U-Lock because it is worth more than the front tire. Then loop the cable through your  front tire and attach to the U-Lock before you close the lock. If you’re using a second U-Lock instead then use it to secure your front tire to your frame.
If someone really wants to steal your bike they will. However most thieves will look for easier picking if you take these steps to properly lock your bike. And if your bike is registered, it has a much greater chancea of making its way back to you.

A properly locked bike

There are easily thousands of bikes on campus. Any point during the day there are hundreds of bikes locked up at different locations from Sproul and Dwinelle to Moffitt and Barrows, just to name a few. According to the UCPD there have already been 67 bikes stolen this semester alone. That’s quite a few and doesn’t include the bike thefts that haven’t been reported. Bike robbery is a real problem in urban settings like that of UC Berkeley. If you use a bike to get around, there is a decent chance that it will be stolen. However, there a couple steps you can take to help protect your bike. read more »


2120305012_aa4c6e551fFrom flying buttresses to fine teas to mandatory nap-time regimes for all ages, it’s no secret that Europeans are better at life than us. Just ask that sorority girl who always manages to sit in front of you during your Women’s Studies seminar who, as you and anyone within a 20-yard vicinity are all-too aware by now, spent her spring semester nibbling crudités with Gérard Depardieu in the south of France.

San Franciscans seem to agree, at least in the realm of cycling.

Reps from the Municipal Transportation Commission, BART, and the ever-omnipotent SF Municipal Transportation Authority sat down yesterday with a gaggle of bicycling advocates, using European urban planning tactics to blueprint improvements for bike commuters.

In other words, a convention of Bay Area fixie-snobs wishing they lived in Amsterdam.

Three years in the making, the initiative includes read more »