3910336227_4d519fa49bWhen we heard that Berkeley scientists were doing something for Burning Man — you know, that eight-day hippie debauchery festival that stews beneath the hot Nevada sun — we were shocked and, honestly, a little disappointed. Weren’t there other, more productive things for them to be doing, like working at Lawrence Berkeley Lab on an awesomely fast network for research scientists or continuing efforts toward creating sound zombies?

To be fair, we might be a little bitter because we’re not going (eight days off and $300 can be hard to come by) or maybe we were just a little taken aback since the science lab and Burning Man are not necessarily a match made in heaven. Either way, someone had some ‘splaining to do.

Well, it turns out the project, although it isn’t the most noble of undertakings, is read more »


flava flavIt’s that time of year again. No, not spring break, ASUC Elections or midterms … we’re talking about Daylight Savings Time, of course. We’ll save you the trouble of figuring out whether ”spring forward, fall back” means you’re gonna lose an hour or gain an hour of sleep.

 This Sunday, March 14, at 2 a.m. you switch your clock forward to 3 a.m., meaning that you lose an hour. You can blame George Vernon Hudson, an entomologist (insect scientist) from New Zealand, who first proposed the holiday in 1895. But for some reason, DST is not observed in Arizona, Hawaii, Guam, American Samoa, Puerto Rico or the US Virgin Islands.

 According to Wikipedia, “springing forward” was originally introduced to reduce evening usage of incandescent lighting but the extra sunlight has also helped reduce traffic fatalities and crime. Don’t worry, you’ll get that hour back in November.

Image Source: dunechaser under Creative Commons
Daylight Savings Time 2010 and Time Change [associated content]