8794838_75bf474f84

According to a new study lead by sixth-year graduate student Amie Gordon, sleep deprivation makes some people more self-centered and consequently express less gratitude toward romantic partners.

Gratitude is vital in relationships of all kinds. But maybe there is a link between that all-nighter spent writing a paper and that argument that happened the next day?

This is why we at the Clog now have the best prescription for relationship health: Sleep all day. Preferably together. Adopt the sleeping schedule of cats. When you and your partner manage to wake up for the same three hours once a week, the conversation will be all excuse-me’s and thank-you’s.

Remember that Depeche Mode song “Enjoy the Silence”? Well, you can’t talk when you’re sleeping. We believe we have taken this study to its natural conclusion.

This is also why we believe us mega-sleepers are so generous and friendly. Thanks Ms. coffee-lady, we’re well rested and can now properly empathize. Have a massive tip. And Mr. cut-me-off-on-the-freeway? Thanks for not crashing into us, we guess.

Another point in Gordon’s study — who’s pursuing a doctorate in social-personality psychology — is that the expression of gratitude actually affects a person’s mental and physical health. It can lead to “fewer headaches and stomachaches, as well as better cardiovascular health.”

In the back of our minds, most of us know that emotions are biological. Chemicals and whatnot. But sometimes we like to pretend that they’re not. This may be why the expression of gratitude improving someone’s physical health comes as a surprise. Good emotions, good health.

Gordon also said that this “could be another point of research for how other bodily mechanisms, such as feeling hunger or being cold, can affect emotions.” Truly fascinating. Who knew our emotions were so much at the whim of our physical circumstances? We look forward to hearing more.

Image source: Wandering in China under Creative Commons


Hey man. I see you putting your earphones on

Hey man. I see you putting your earphones on ...

You may remember a post we made about a study that concluded that bashful people tend to be more trustworthy and kind than others. Well, it may be that such trustworthy behavior is based, to an extent, on genetics.

Two dozen couples participated in a recent study from UC Berkeley led by Aleksandr Kogan where each couple was recorded as they talked to each other about difficult experiences they went through. Each partner would take turns to talk about their times of suffering or simply listen. Only when a partner was “listening” would they be filmed.

A separate group of participants, unrelated to any of the couples, then watched 20 second video clips of each “listener” and were asked to fill out a survey in which they rated who appeared to be the most empathetic and trustworthy. read more »


420031677_760eb87973

The “walk a mile in someone else’s shoes” advice is so trite that we’re tempted to scream whenever we hear it mentioned. However, we will admit (yes, even snarky, jaded bloggers like ourselves) that empathy is a valuable character trait (and not just if you’re minoring in global poverty).

So you wanna know something weird? Some people may actually be more empathetic based on their genes. Researchers at Berkeley recently discovered that certain people with “a particular variation of the oxytocin receptor gene” nicknamed read more »