google car

Nowadays, we are all pretty familiar with the term “cloud” as it relates to our Internet gadgets. Information is stored off of a device, with the device simply accessing it. So researchers on a multi-university team are taking this idea and looking into how to implement it on a massive scale. They are calling this the TerraSwarm.

Ambitious? Oh yeah. Risky? Of course. We already publish a ton of private information on the Internet. Mobile devices also have a ridiculous amount of access to your information: where you are, who you’re talking to and what you say. Being connected to a TerraSwarm — as the name suggests, an Earth-spanning network — may leave people vulnerable in ways we can’t predict.

But it also has the potential to improve everyone’s quality of life. We’re looking forward to seeing the results of this ambitious research project led by campus EECS professor Edward A. Lee.

According to a press release from the TerraSwarm Research Center, sensors would collect data such as “embedded vision, audio, location, movement, temperature and air quality,” and actuators would put that information to work. These things could be used to “direct the control of physical devices in smart buildings, transportation systems, medical systems, security systems, and homes.”

Just think about it: fully automated transportation systems (coupled with Google’s self-driving car), houses that sense when you’re hungry and cook you a meal (maybe we’re taking this too far) and phones that sense when you’re drunk-dialing and call you a jackass.

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We at the Clog, like most, were ecstatic to leave the disaster that is CalMail behind for bMail. However, now that most Cal students have been moved over to bMail, many are finding that their @berkeley.edu email no longer syncs to their smartphones. If you are one of those students, or want to set up sync for the first time, then we have some steps to get your bMail properly synced to your phone.

1. Migrate to bMail
If you haven’t actually migrated to bMail yet, do it! You’ll be moved over to the gorgeous Gmail environment which is faster, cleaner and easier to use. All your past email will be moved over to your new account, and your CalMail will stop receiving new mail.

2. Create a Google key for your bConnected account
With the new system, you’re going to need to create a Google Key to sync any of your bConnected apps. You will use this as your password instead of your CalNet password when you set up bMail to sync on your phone. To set up your Google Key, you’ll need to go to the “Manage my keys page.” Log in with your CalNet ID and then select “bApps (Google).” Select the “Set Key” button. At this point you will see a randomly generated password. You can accept this password by selecting “Set Key” again, or you can choose the “Define your own tab” and set your own key.

3. Sync bMail with your iPhone or Android (Skip to step four for other third-party clients)
We’re almost there. If you’re using the Gmail app on iPhone or Android then all you have to do is sign in with your full @berkeley.edu email address and enter your Google Key as the password. It’s also just as simple if you want to use the iPhone’s mail app. Go to setting and select mail. Add a new account and choose Gmail, and then log in as if you were using the Gmail app. Gmail should sync, and you now have bMail on your phone!

4. How to log in with a third-party client
All third-party clients are a little different, but here’s the information you’ll need. When asked to log in, be sure to use your Google Key, not your CalNet ID password. When you are asked to chose a retrieval Protocal choose IMAP, not pop3 (IMAP allows you to view your emails on multiple devices much easier than read more »


Among the tabs for CNN, NBC, the deplorably slow Google election results, and the FOX News you had open just for kicks, you may not have had time for social networking on election night. Who are you kidding – you probably popped open Tumblr for the continuing influx of memes or Twitter for Donald Trump’s call for a march on Washington. But the most interesting soiial network every time there’s a major news event is Facebook, because it’s people that you – hopefully – personally know talking about things about which they know little to nothing about. If your friends are anything like ours, they provided for plenty of unintentional comedy with their cute status updates that spammed the newsfeed.

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We all love Google. No matter how many ads we see about Bing beating Google in blind tests, we’ll still use Google. So Calmail switching over to Google Apps (and basically Gmail) is great. Also, the new CalMail will be called bMail. Just throwing that out there to avoid confusion.

Or is it? read more »


We love those teachers that let us get away with any form of electronic devices in the classroom. After all, class is boundEtiquette Guide - Laptops In Class to get a little boring from time to time, and considering that humans have an average attention span a little less than that of a goldfish, a computer can be a good thing to have around. But when there are a few hundred other people sitting in the same lecture hall as you – there are some basics you should adhere to.

DON’T: Keep your volume on. Nobody wants to hear the start-up sound of your MacBook, as refreshing as it may be. Just take a second to hit the mute button right before you leave your dorm so that you don’t accidentally expose your embarrassing affinity for Justin Bieber as you prop open your laptop in that 8 a.m. Economics lecture.

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If you peruse through YouTube as much as we do, you’ve probably noticed self-driving car test, which Google put out to the general public. At first glance, of course we all thought, “AUMG Google’s one step closer to dominating the world!” Indeed, one of the top rated comments right now is “Skynet now drives a Prius.”

All lulz aside, Ethan Elkind, a climate-change research fellow at Berkeley law, discusses how self-driving cars could actually be great for the environment. This makes sense as mechanically controlled speeds and turns could make an individual’s drive optimally efficient just as cruise control helps save gas on long boring drives. Plus, self-driving automobiles remove a lot of what causes car accidents: human error! Never mind the nearly impossible situations when human judgment trumps the mechanical … most of our crashes involve someone not making smart decisions. Like drinking and driving. Keep that soda in the cup holder while you’re driving!

Elkind goes on to mention that said Google car is a step towards this kind of technology. Just one of the few major concerns this technology entails is the insurance liability. Who’s fault is it when your self-driving car crashes? Yours? Google’s? Toyota’s/Ford’s/etc? Either way, this is a great pathway to new technological trends.

Could self-driving cars help the environment? [The Berkeley Blog]


5640108420_b9a4d89915Calling all expert namers (this means you, Adam and Eve)! As you may or may not know, the CalMail system proved to be a huge failure last semester, leaving the entire Berkeley community scrambling for a solution. Luckily, the almighty and all-powerful Google has stepped in to take the reigns, and now an entirely new and improved mail (and calendar) system looms on the horizon.

Who cares if it works though, the IT Productivity Suite Team is more concerned about having a really clever and inventive name to compete with the respective (and witty) UC Davis and UC Santa Cruz “AggieMail” and “Slugmail” systems. And so, the team has enlisted the help of the creative minds at UC Berkeley with a friendly naming competition. Think you have what it takes? read more »


ComputersssIt’s been a strange time for the Internet recently. CalMail traumatized students and faculty forever, Megaupload.com met its demise and, in a strange twist of fate, there was a mass outage of approximately 80 campus department websites (mostly Letters & Science) since January  17 due to a hardware failure at Dreamhost, the hosting provider for many of Cal’s web pages. There is no estimated date when the sites will be back up due to the large number of clients affected by the hardware failure, but the Dreamhost blog is regularly posting updates on the recovery process. In the meantime, the main L&S page is still up and offers departmental contact information as well a brief overview of each major for those poor, poor souls who are still modifying their Fall schedules.

Speaking of CalMail traumatizing students and faculty read more »


facebookBefore you go showing all your Facebook friends the creatively revealing outfit that you’ll be wearing this weekend (ie. the St. Louis Cardinals bra and panty set that you just so happen to have so you decided to call it a costume, or the neon green Borat “mankini” that you thought would be funny but was really just disturbing), you might want to read this first. Especially if you’re applying to law school.

According to a national survey by Kaplan Test Prep, law schools aren’t shy about doing online background checks on their applicants. Of the surveyed law schools (which included 128 American Bar Association-accredited schools), 41 percent of their admissions officers Google-searched their applicants online and 37 percent searched social networking profiles like Facebook.

Now ask yourself this: Do you have anything on your Facebook that might be perceived as controversial? Here are a few things that might be deal breakers for some admissions officers. read more »


Sexiest costume ever.

Apparently the best costume ever.

Halloween weekend is finally here and we are sure that most of you are either putting finishing touches on your elaborate costumes or, laughing at such a waste of energy, throwing on a Santa hat and calling it a day (can you guess where we lie on the spectrum?). As we all know, thinking up of costume designs can be an overwhelming task — limited only by your imagination and amount of disposable income.

That said, while some go off the beaten path and inspire with their truly unique costumes, many  fall into the trap of thinking of an “original” design and then realizing that pretty much everyone else had the same costume idea as they did (naughty angel, how original). So what are some popular costume ideas that will possibly be littering parties this weekend?  Yesterday, Google released a list of most-searched Halloween costumes for 2011. The list is as follows:  read more »


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