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According to a new study lead by sixth-year graduate student Amie Gordon, sleep deprivation makes some people more self-centered and consequently express less gratitude toward romantic partners.

Gratitude is vital in relationships of all kinds. But maybe there is a link between that all-nighter spent writing a paper and that argument that happened the next day?

This is why we at the Clog now have the best prescription for relationship health: Sleep all day. Preferably together. Adopt the sleeping schedule of cats. When you and your partner manage to wake up for the same three hours once a week, the conversation will be all excuse-me’s and thank-you’s.

Remember that Depeche Mode song “Enjoy the Silence”? Well, you can’t talk when you’re sleeping. We believe we have taken this study to its natural conclusion.

This is also why we believe us mega-sleepers are so generous and friendly. Thanks Ms. coffee-lady, we’re well rested and can now properly empathize. Have a massive tip. And Mr. cut-me-off-on-the-freeway? Thanks for not crashing into us, we guess.

Another point in Gordon’s study — who’s pursuing a doctorate in social-personality psychology — is that the expression of gratitude actually affects a person’s mental and physical health. It can lead to “fewer headaches and stomachaches, as well as better cardiovascular health.”

In the back of our minds, most of us know that emotions are biological. Chemicals and whatnot. But sometimes we like to pretend that they’re not. This may be why the expression of gratitude improving someone’s physical health comes as a surprise. Good emotions, good health.

Gordon also said that this “could be another point of research for how other bodily mechanisms, such as feeling hunger or being cold, can affect emotions.” Truly fascinating. Who knew our emotions were so much at the whim of our physical circumstances? We look forward to hearing more.

Image source: Wandering in China under Creative Commons


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In an interview, Christine Carter expresses the importance of teaching gratitude to children. Carter, a sociologist, happiness expert and director of UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Parents program says that this gratitude can make for a happier family.

She draws the differentiation between gratitude and entitlement in kids, stating that often children feel like they are entitled to what they have rather than gracious. Entitlement, according to Carter, leads to feelings of disappointment and frustration while gratitude results in happiness and satisfaction.

When asked about the best ways to teach kids appreciation, Carter emphasizes a straightforward approach, “Simply counting your blessings in a routine way works wonders. In my family, we talk about what we are grateful for at dinnertime. Again at bedtime, my kids tell me about their “three good things” that happened during the day.”

And what better time to start practicing gratitude than Thanksgiving season?

Image source: Mikey G Ottawa under Creative Commons
Teaching kids gratitude instead of entitlement [UC Berkeley News]


It's cooool, homeslice.

So there we were, right? Just minding our own business, scrollin’ through the ol’ UC Berkeley Events Calendar when we stumbled across this gem of a seminar. Apparently some dudes with P.h.D.s (one of whom got his from Stanford) are coming to International House next Friday, Sept. 25 to give a seminar called “The Science of a Meaningful Life: Forgiveness and Gratitude.

Attendees will purportedly come out of the eight-hour thing being able to … read more »