Just two of the many gleeful Berkeley professors

Just two of the many gleeful Berkeley professors

Do you ever get the feeling that your professors are incredibly excited to come to class every day? You know, that moment in a chem demo when a manly master of molecules lets out a girlish giggle after a methane explosion? Or in a philosophy discussion, as the instructor laughs maniacally watching the class struggle to prove the existence of the universe? Our professors seem so motivated. In fact, according to this Glassdoor poll of American professors in leading universities, Berkeley ranks within the top 10, with an average rating of 4.0 (very satisfied) of universities to work for. Wonder why? Don’t worry, we’ll tell you.

The campus

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The true masters of Berkeley

Ah, yes, the trees. The way they sway in the bay breeze. Our beautiful campus emanates contentment. In addition to the abundant natural wildlife of squirrels, squirrels and squirrels, the majestic architecture gives the professors a sense of accomplishment. They feel proud to work at a site of grandeur, and their satisfaction reflects it. It almost makes all the construction worth it.

A social conscience

Our researchers are at a university with both a big enough pocketbook to support world class scientific research and the careful attitude that makes sure we spend the money in a way that provides the most benefit to everyone. Berkeley is the best academically, but it also looks at environmental and social consequences of its actions. This makes professors feel like people living among people — not robots forced to produce results, no matter the cost. Like at Stanford.

The students

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Fiat lux, indeed

Imagine a school where professors are forced to educate giant turds. It is a sad picture, but for the professors at Stanford, that is what life entails. The professors at Berkeley are happy because their students are not giant turds but rather bright and enthusiastic young men and women who want to make the world a better place. For the most part, we Cal students do not go through the motions because we see it as a way to get a job —many of us are genuinely interested in our majors, and our enthusiasm shows it. No wonder our professors love us!

Image source: Global X, BinaryApe under Creative Commons and Kamin Kahrizi, The Daily Californian




2324823553_39f2a86eafSometimes rankings can get us down, and we are reminded of their flaws. But when they make us look good, we can’t help but celebrate. The Economist recently came out with their new rankings of full-time business schools throughout the world. Do you even need to ask if Haas is on the list? Number six, baby. Just below Harvard. And TWO  spots above that other school.

The majority of the schools in the top 10 are from the U.S. (seven), but the list includes universities all over the world. The Economist asked read more »


Sorry, couldn’t decide which cheesy reference we wanted to go with for the post title. We just kind of figured, y’know, why choose? This philosophy also explains why the above video is from neither of those movies. Trust us, the cheap shot-ishness of all three jokes will become evident shortly …

Because UC Berkeley is number 10 on Spinner’s list of the top 20 colleges of RAWK, based on musically famous alumni! Good thing Stephan Jenkins didn’t really want something else and Adam Duritz didn’t fall accidentally in love with some other campus. Oh, and also, good thing Stewart Copeland didn’t get stung by the police while he was here.  Eh? Arewerite or what?! read more »


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Stanfurd is the number one most stressful college in the United States. Period.

At least, that’s what “The Daily Beast” said. They ranked the 50 most stressful colleges in America and came up with the top 5 of Stanford, Columbia, MIT, University of Pennsylvania, and Harvard. Berkeley placed a measly 22nd. We don’t really know whether to be pleased or angry about this, especially since it seems just a tad untrue. We’ll settle for incredulous read more »


According to Eventful, an aggregation site of local events, Berkeley ranks No. 2 as a “Small but Eventful” city. W00t. More bragging rights. So who beat us out then?

read more »


Our lives wouldn’t be complete without a yearly dose of rankings fever. The Economist released their (completely irrelevant, unnecessarily reductionist, totally and without a doubt worthless) rankings of the best full-time MBA programs in the world early this week. Naturally, Haas made the list. The surprise is that someone beat the bigwigs to the punch: Schools in both Switzerland and Spain ranked higher than the usual US titans. Crazy business people! Well, Swiss craziness, which is considerably less crazy than actual craziness.

List of the programs after the jump. read more »


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U.S. News releases its yearly university rankings. Everyone tries not to care. The magazine issue flies off racks anyway.

Incestuous bit-point ranking tussles among the top Ivies be damned, the Clog’s more interested in how our own university did in this year’s grad school lists, which follow after the jump. read more »


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BusinessWeek released their Best Undergrad B-Schools rankings last week. The usually much-touted Haas School of Business pulled an ass-backward slide from its perennial number three perch to the inglorious No. 11 spot, and all in the space of one year.

What happened, the concerned student may ask? read more »


Cal fans, click on ze linkage. Such a thing was unthinkable before the ass-kicking savior’s reign. Hell, actually beating the Ducks in Oregon was unthinkable before his miracle work.

Are we happy about this? Cal football fans kind of have to be. There are some nagging questions, though. Does our team have an identity? Does Nate Longshore inspire confidence? Is he even healthy? Is the defense actually good? Is Oski a little bit creepy (he reminds us of a certain scene in “The Shining”)?

Our superstitious inclination to eschew early celebration is causing all this sacrilegious questioning. We apologize. Enjoying the moment seems like a logical thing to do. Still, those nagging thoughts of impending USC-delivered doom are currently present. Actually, thoughts be damned. We’re just going to push those out of our sturdy golden domes, and celebrate our No. 3 ranking in the nonsensical world of college football. No. 3, baby!!!

Image Source: Michael Smith, Daily Cal
2007 NCAA Football Rankings – Week 5 [ESPN]


Looks like the UC Board of Regents spotted the financial potential in Haas’ recent climb to the No. 2 spot on the Wall Street Journal’s Survey of Business School Programs. Paying big money to be a slave to the Man just got a tad bit more expensive.

Not even a week after the survey was released, the mysterious Regents who get our tuition checks every month announced their decision to increase UC professional school fees by about $15,000 over the next three years (Clarification: The total fees will increase by $15,000.)

Their main reason? “(T)he fee increases were necessary to maintain quality programs and to stay competitive with other high-ranking institutions,” according to the Daily Cal.

Translation: The University of California would like to attain its rightful place on silly media surveys, which are about as revealing as psychics on the Montel Williams show. Aside from the Wall Street Journal’s Survey, there’s also the controversially simplistic rankings of U.S. News. (These rankings are usually deemed insubstantial; that is, unless one attends the No. 1 Public University in the country.)

Well, the regents may have broken the big-time professional dreams of countless prospective Boalt and Haas students’ moms and dads, but look on the bright side, all you disgruntled wannabe Cochrans and Trumps: You are now free to pick your own wardrobe, speak your mind and stick it to the Man. Maybe you can even go to art school, like you’ve always wanted!

UC OKs Fee Hike for Professional Schools [Daily Cal]
Earlier: Takin’ Care of Business: UC Berkeley Outshines the Rest


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