Picture this:

Can more invasive social contact by others indicate shrinking boundaries around privacy?

Can more invasive social contact by others indicate shrinking boundaries around our privacy?

It’s nearly 10 p.m., and you’re at home, brushing your teeth. Your iPhone starts screaming. You snap to attention, no thanks to that inherent anxiety that accompanies living as a young single woman in an urban environment. You grudgingly answer the phone, hoping to be greeted by an automated pharmacy reminder’s monotone, and not a friend needing a ride at this time of night. Instead, it’s some dude asking if you’ve heard about Prop Something for the third time and if you have a few minutes to talk. You grit your teeth and try muster up some manners.

Sound like last night? Join the club.
As you all know elections are today, November 6th. While we’re excited to be casting our ballots, we believe we can speak for nearly all in lamenting over the amount of recent “encouragement” we’ve received to cast those votes. Just this week alone, we’ve received half a dozen calls from local campaigns encouraging either a vote for a particular candidate, or a yea or nay on a particular measure (We’re looking at you, “Yes on Prop 32″-ers.) It’s a given that building support through direct contact methods like telephone calls is far from new, but we’d like to make a case for some boundaries around the use of those methods. Call us old-fashioned, but we fondly regard that old (and apparently outdated) custom of refraining from calling a lady after dark.

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Spring break is finally here (a shining beacon of light comes down from the heavens and a chorus sings “Hallelujah!”). The only thing separating us from the friends, family and sleep at the end of the tunnel is the San Francisco International Airport. Here is our report from the field:

7:00 p.m: Arrive at the BART station. Dragging our suitcases down the stairs at the station causes a lot of eyes to land on us. The embarrassment finally ends when we get to the bottom, but then we notice that the train has just arrived! Is this the one we want? Where do we transfer? We don’t have time to worry because we either get on here or wait for the next one, and we hate waiting, so we jump on.

7:15 p.m: We have the right train and we are on our way! Just transferred at MacArthur station and there are so many people on the train that a certain black suitcase keeps getting in people’s way, falling and causing them to trip (ok, it was our suitcase but the BART is shaky!). The world seems to move so fast when you are on BART. From the window, SF looks like an Impressionist painting, as we only catch a glimpse of the blurred city landscape. Looking at our watch, we see that we still have about 45 minutes till we reach the airport and our plane leaves at 9:25 p.m. We are not following the parent’s advise of getting there at LEAST two hours early. Hope there are no bumps along the way!

8:00 p.m: We have made it to the airport! Now we find our way to the futuristic tram with the soothing robot voice that takes us to our terminal. Maybe we have read too many science-fiction novels, but that’s how we see it.

8: 20 p.m: read more »