Adjusting to a sleep schedule that is less than your winter break average of 10 hoursSleepy Roommates Are Not Couple Material takes some getting used to, especially when you’re sleeping with one or more sleep-deprived students within 10 feet of you. Unfortunately for you and everyone trapped in that confined space with you, a new study has shown that poor sleep can make romantic partners unappreciated. While we understand that in most cases you and your roommates are not romantically involved, we extrapolated these results to dynamic of Cal students.

One of the main observations of this study is that though one person may have slept soundly, the couple can experience problems if just one of the pair didn’t. With the early-semester overload of classes coupled with the habit of sleeping as the sun starts to come up, there’s a fairly high chance that someone in your dorm or apartment woke up in a cranky mood. And it doesn’t help that someone is bound to have an 8 a.m. class and an annoying alarm that resembles the assortment of noises a car makes when broken into. It’s fair to say that this study is accurate – fewer words are exchanged when people are running low on energy, and it leaves less opportunity for commonplace phrases like “thank you.” No one likes to feel unappreciated, particularly when we’re all pushing ourselves to work the hardest we can.

Another important point that was brought up was how a lack of sleep allots less patience for the idiosyncrasies that you’re used to. For example, the fact that your roommate eats his breakfast one Cheerio at a time may not have particularly caught your attention before, but the constant clinking of the spoon against the bowl would be quick to draw your ire if you’re already feeling sleepy in the morning. Projecting that annoyance into an aura around you can be contagious too, so be careful of how open you are with your emotions after a bad night.

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According to a new study lead by sixth-year graduate student Amie Gordon, sleep deprivation makes some people more self-centered and consequently express less gratitude toward romantic partners.

Gratitude is vital in relationships of all kinds. But maybe there is a link between that all-nighter spent writing a paper and that argument that happened the next day?

This is why we at the Clog now have the best prescription for relationship health: Sleep all day. Preferably together. Adopt the sleeping schedule of cats. When you and your partner manage to wake up for the same three hours once a week, the conversation will be all excuse-me’s and thank-you’s.

Remember that Depeche Mode song “Enjoy the Silence”? Well, you can’t talk when you’re sleeping. We believe we have taken this study to its natural conclusion.

This is also why we believe us mega-sleepers are so generous and friendly. Thanks Ms. coffee-lady, we’re well rested and can now properly empathize. Have a massive tip. And Mr. cut-me-off-on-the-freeway? Thanks for not crashing into us, we guess.

Another point in Gordon’s study — who’s pursuing a doctorate in social-personality psychology — is that the expression of gratitude actually affects a person’s mental and physical health. It can lead to “fewer headaches and stomachaches, as well as better cardiovascular health.”

In the back of our minds, most of us know that emotions are biological. Chemicals and whatnot. But sometimes we like to pretend that they’re not. This may be why the expression of gratitude improving someone’s physical health comes as a surprise. Good emotions, good health.

Gordon also said that this “could be another point of research for how other bodily mechanisms, such as feeling hunger or being cold, can affect emotions.” Truly fascinating. Who knew our emotions were so much at the whim of our physical circumstances? We look forward to hearing more.

Image source: Wandering in China under Creative Commons


What going to Cal can feel like.

What going to Cal can feel like.

Sometimes we get a little psycho during stressful times in college. We find ourselves doing crazy things like staying up all night studying, or waking up with our heads on our desks. While that regretted crick in your neck will even itself out eventually, you might want to take a closer look at yourself if your bad study habits have forced you to trade your ID lanyard for a neck brace.

Here are ten signs that getting that perfect GPA might be more trouble than it’s worth:

1. The milk in your fridge isn’t for cereal, it’s coffee creamer. (Breakfast? What’s that?)

2. Actually, scratch that – Red Bull: Breakfast of champions.

3. Someone tells you your mascara is running. Turns out they’re talking about the permanent dark circles under your eyes.

4. You’ve re-read three textbooks to pass your history class, and still get a B.

5. You consider dropping out because of that B.

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Lately, we haven’t been sleeping too well. We know many of you probably haven’t either, since the midterm season brings more than just exam stress. It brings an entire mid-semester slump! (Maybe it’s partly due to some bad sleeping habits?)

Here’s a few tips to getting better sleep, tailored to a sleep-deprived student body:

If you need rest, keep reading.

If you need rest, keep reading.

1. Organize your thoughts in a new, systematic way.

We’ve found that writing down a “to improve” list can be helpful. Why? In general, students deal with a large number of smaller stresses — exams, disagreements with roommates, buying textbooks — versus something larger. It can often feel overwhelming to try to constantly sort priorities, compartmentalize and keep focused with so many things to remember. As a result, we feel overwhelmed and plagued by worry! Keeping your priorities accessible and clear can eliminate an urge to mentally “search” and therefore lead to less struggle in falling asleep. (Read more about sleep and organization here.)

2. Take a closer look at read more »


Grizzly Bear

It’s 3:30 a.m. You should be blissfully asleep. Instead you’re wide eyed awake because of the snoring coming from the bear that is inside your roommate. You’re pretty sure that every time your roommate inhales the whole building rattles. read more »

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Some people swear by the power nap, others simply call it a myth. The power nap is traditionally thought of as an afternoon nap that lasts somewhere between fifteen and thirty minutes. When done right, Power napping has numerous benefits. A power nap relieves stress and allows you to re-energize. You’ll also be more productive and alert when you return to work. According to Web MD (Dr. Web is a real doctor right?) there are few main keys to power napping.

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computerWe’ve all been there: pulling an all-nighter in an energy-drink-fueled haze of stress and sleep-deprivation trying to pump out that paper due in 5 hours. On those nights, eye-strain is the last thing you need to compound the situation. And because most of us have one or two roommates – and perhaps not the convenience of another place to work – we have to work with the lights off. The thing is, staring at a well-lit screen in a dark room is the exact thing that causes eye-strain. But not only that: a study done by the National Sleep Foundation has found that the use of bright, interactive technologies like the computer may disrupt the sleep-onset process.

The application f.lux is designed to alleviate those problems. read more »


sleeping white tiger

It has come to the Clog’s attention that sleep deprivation WILL drive up anxiety, according to a recent study done by Andrea Goldstein at UC Berkeley’s Neuroimaging Laboratory. WOW. What paradigm shifting, life changing, groundbreaking scientific research. Hmm, we wonder what’s going to happen to us when we juice ourselves on caffeine and 5-hour energies and stay up for 36 hours. There’s no way we could possibly become more anxious, is there?  read more »


squidwardCollege is a time of change. A time to figure out who we are and what it is we want out of life. We learn so many new things, about ourselves, about the world, about drinking heavily. It’s probably the time in our lives when we experience the most growth. Specifically, we grow from an eager, motivated freshman to a jaded, lazy senior. It’s a natural trajectory, so don’t be alarmed. Wondering where you fall on the DGAF scale? Check out our analysis below and decide for yourself.

Level 1: YEAH! LEARN ALL THE THINGS! GO TO ALL THE OFFICE HOURS!

Also known as eager freshman. You’re just so jazzed to be out of high school. You picked your own classes. You don’t have to be up at the ass-crack of dawn anymore. In fact, you can sleep ‘til 11:00 a.m., because all of your classes start after noon. This is unheard of in your little pre-college world. Plus, you can eat whatever you want. Could it get any better? Getting an A never looked so easy. read more »


PARTYWe’ve all been there. It’s Friday (or Thursday, or Saturday or Sunday) night, and the sun has retired beyond the horizon. Dinner is over, and you’re standing at the threshold of another weekend evening in Berkeley. Do you go out? Do you stay in? There are a lot of potential activities that could determine the trajectory of your night’s path. However, these potential activities all depend on how much residual energy you have from another taxing week at Cal. Lucky for you, we’ve made a handy dandy party scale that you should all pin on your walls and refer to every weekend until the end of time.

Level 1: Sleep (and/or refresh Facebook and Tumblr for a few hours)

Sometimes it happens. Maybe it was a long week, filled with midterms and expert bullshitting tactics. It’s not something we can control. It’s always a good thing to fall asleep at 10 p.m. and to slip into a small coma for 12+ hours. Even if that means passing out in your jeans.

Level 2: Get some take out and watch T.V.

For those nights when you’re not on the verge of death but you’re also not super stoked about leaving your house. You’re already in your pajamas and in bed. Time to have a fat party. Call in some Thai food, crack open a gallon of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream and put on some restorative television (“30 Rock” is a great fit). read more »


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