Currently sophomores, we used to live in a ski lodge cozy Northside dorm known as Foothill.

We never understood the rationale behind the name. As any Foothill resident or ex-resident knows, Foothill is certainly not at the foot of any hill. Ironically, Foothill is notorious for being more towards the top of a hill, a fortress you can only breach by taking a series of treacherously long staircases. We can’t count how many times we’ve tripped up, down, and all around those cursed steps.

Pretz

In Berkeley lore, Foothill is “that Northside dorm” few Southside residents ever venture to, no matter how tempting Foothill’s Late Night steak may be. Foothill is also known as the home of reclusive future engineers. From our experience as residents, however, we found that Foothill had plenty of variation in engineering personalities, as well as in intensity of social life, that differed from floor to floor, building to building, and suite to suite.

Luckily for us, we ended up in a suite where most of us got along pretty well. In fact, we currently live in the same apartment with some of our suitemates, now close friends. Although we live close by, we don’t see these suitemates nearly as often as we once did back at the dorms—which brings us to the difference in social life between apartments versus dorms: read more »


Freshmen from back in the day were way cooler, no lie.

Freshmen from back in the day were way cooler.

Responding to a question posed by the New York Times regarding how college freshmen have “changed,” professors from across the country weighed in with expectedly dismal pronouncements regarding the modern student’s ability to transition into independent life.

“Students are different now,” laments Linda Bips, a psychologist and assistant professor at Muhlenberg College. According to her, current college students were raised in an environment so as to become overly sensitive to failure.

“Our world is more stressful in general because of the current economic and political realities, but I don’t believe that the college experience itself is more intense today than the past 10 years. What I do think is that many students are often not prepared to be young ‘adults’ with all the responsibilities of life.”

The quotation marks enclosing the term ‘adults?’ That hurts. But perhaps not as much as what Bips has to say about the adverse effects of our apparent immaturity on professors like her, who are forced into “[assisting] in the basic parenting of these students.” Sigh. read more »