Picture this:

Can more invasive social contact by others indicate shrinking boundaries around privacy?

Can more invasive social contact by others indicate shrinking boundaries around our privacy?

It’s nearly 10 p.m., and you’re at home, brushing your teeth. Your iPhone starts screaming. You snap to attention, no thanks to that inherent anxiety that accompanies living as a young single woman in an urban environment. You grudgingly answer the phone, hoping to be greeted by an automated pharmacy reminder’s monotone, and not a friend needing a ride at this time of night. Instead, it’s some dude asking if you’ve heard about Prop Something for the third time and if you have a few minutes to talk. You grit your teeth and try muster up some manners.

Sound like last night? Join the club.
As you all know elections are today, November 6th. While we’re excited to be casting our ballots, we believe we can speak for nearly all in lamenting over the amount of recent “encouragement” we’ve received to cast those votes. Just this week alone, we’ve received half a dozen calls from local campaigns encouraging either a vote for a particular candidate, or a yea or nay on a particular measure (We’re looking at you, “Yes on Prop 32″-ers.) It’s a given that building support through direct contact methods like telephone calls is far from new, but we’d like to make a case for some boundaries around the use of those methods. Call us old-fashioned, but we fondly regard that old (and apparently outdated) custom of refraining from calling a lady after dark.

Remember way back when we discussed the incoming freshman class? Little did we know that one of them would be making news … before her time at Cal.

Allison Stokke, a high school senior, is coming to Cal to join the track and field team. Despite her great athleticism, Stokke’s not getting attention for her pole vaulting. Instead, she’s getting oggled.

See that video up there? It sure isn’t great television, but it’s been viewed over 300,000 times.

It all started on With Leather, a sports blog run by Matt Ufford. On May 8, Ufford introduced Stokke with “hubba hubba and other grunting sounds.” Granted, he did mention her talent:

bq. Miss Stokke is one of the best young pole vaulters in the country. She set the U.S. record for a freshman girl at 12’8″, and her present personal best is a couple inches off the best high school girls mark. So, that’s why I’m honoring her with a post. Because she’s an exceptional athlete. Yes.

The post got some very interesting attention, to say the least. One commenter chimed, “She can vault my pole any time.” Har har.

To Stokke, it wasn’t funny. Washington Post reports she got 1,000 messages on her MySpace. Now her father’s looking through message boards to pick out potential stalkers.

Wait a minute. Stokke talked to Washington Post, but she doesn’t want any more attention? Isn’t that kinda … well … counterintuitive?

But really, stop being pervy. You’re acting like you’ve never seen an attractive girl before.

Her “athleticism” earned her multiple Facebook groups, some of which have popped up in a matter of 24 hours. The two largest, however, existed prior to the Post article.

Fine, fine, here are your obligatory links: I’m Stoked For Stokke!!! and Fans of Allison Stokke.

In response to the article, Ufford posted more pictures of Stokke with “written permission of the photographer.” So much for sympathy.

So good job, Washington Post. An article complaining about unwanted attention manages to generate even more attention. It seems like the next step is for Stokke to start dating Enrique Iglesias and then star in his steamy music video.

Hey, at least she’s prettier than Jonny Moseley.

Teen Tests Internet’s Lewd Track Record [Washington Post]
POLE VAULTING IS SEXY, BARELY LEGAL [With Leather]
PLEASE BE RESPECTFUL OF ALLISON STOKKE [With Leather