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We at the Clog know inequalities between men and women in the workplace sucks. A new study led by a UC Berkeley psychologist has looked into the issue and found that these obstacles affect women who also run their households more than we thought. (Basically, they have fewer career ambitions.)

Of course, the study also found that men’s ambitions weren’t affected when they were in control of the household.

We have empowered women without the appropriate shift in gender values. As of the 2010 census, more working women over 25 have bachelor’s degrees than men. Yet among the Fortune 500, they hold just 16.6 percent of board seats and just 14.3 percent of executive officer positions, according to an NBC news article. There’s more qualified women, yet they’re underrepresented at the highest positions. What’s the deal? Nothing makes sense.

Out of college, women earn 82 percent of what men earn. Women are just as ambitious and capable as men, but the glass ceiling is real. Our expectations of women have not changed to recognize their capabilities.

“Being in charge of household decisions may bring a semblance of power to women’s traditional role, to the point where women may have less desire to push against the obstacles to achieving additional power outside the home,” said UC Berkeley psychologist Serena Chen in a press release.

In education, we are in 2013; but when it comes to “traditional roles,” we may as well be in the 1960s. read more »


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According to a new study lead by sixth-year graduate student Amie Gordon, sleep deprivation makes some people more self-centered and consequently express less gratitude toward romantic partners.

Gratitude is vital in relationships of all kinds. But maybe there is a link between that all-nighter spent writing a paper and that argument that happened the next day?

This is why we at the Clog now have the best prescription for relationship health: Sleep all day. Preferably together. Adopt the sleeping schedule of cats. When you and your partner manage to wake up for the same three hours once a week, the conversation will be all excuse-me’s and thank-you’s.

Remember that Depeche Mode song “Enjoy the Silence”? Well, you can’t talk when you’re sleeping. We believe we have taken this study to its natural conclusion.

This is also why we believe us mega-sleepers are so generous and friendly. Thanks Ms. coffee-lady, we’re well rested and can now properly empathize. Have a massive tip. And Mr. cut-me-off-on-the-freeway? Thanks for not crashing into us, we guess.

Another point in Gordon’s study — who’s pursuing a doctorate in social-personality psychology — is that the expression of gratitude actually affects a person’s mental and physical health. It can lead to “fewer headaches and stomachaches, as well as better cardiovascular health.”

In the back of our minds, most of us know that emotions are biological. Chemicals and whatnot. But sometimes we like to pretend that they’re not. This may be why the expression of gratitude improving someone’s physical health comes as a surprise. Good emotions, good health.

Gordon also said that this “could be another point of research for how other bodily mechanisms, such as feeling hunger or being cold, can affect emotions.” Truly fascinating. Who knew our emotions were so much at the whim of our physical circumstances? We look forward to hearing more.

Image source: Wandering in China under Creative Commons


As the Finals issue features a great article on study-friendly instrumental tracks, we got inspired to explore the relationship of music and focus a bit further. It’s no surprise that while studying, many students prefer white noise or music to the jarring sound of chairs scraping throughout Moffit. But are there particular types of music that are more conducive to learning or focus? Some research suggests there are.

Studies in music and cognition receiving most media attention are those focused on what many dub the Mozart effect. The term usually refers to several similar theories, all centered on the idea that classical music may aid in temporary or long-term learning enhancement. In one experiment, students exposed to classical music showed increased — but temporary — spatial-temporal reasoning ability.

Similarly, gamma waves can describe a specific pattern of neural oscillations — brain waves — at a frequency of around 50 Hz. Researchers such as György Buzsaki have published evidence suggesting that the nature of the frequency of these waves may aid conscious attention through facilitating activity within the thalamus, a brain structure partially involved in alertness and consciousness. While the theory remains in need of further support, we still suggest trying out gamma-wave music therapy for yourself!

Our favorite tracks
We love Youtube tracks (1) Biaural Beats: Study, Focus, Concentrate and (2) High focus – Gamma brainwaves in particular, because they’re repetitive enough to discourage distraction. For those who might prefer classical music, we suggest the (3) Study Music Project, also on Youtube. Happy finals prep week!

-R.S.

Image source: Karmalize under Creative Commons.


Last month (yes, it’s December now!) we brought to you our first library crawl. But since there are a lot of libraries at UC Berkeley (in case you didn’t know), one crawl simply wasn’t enough. In this crawl, we bring to you Morrison, Bancroft and the Law Library. We hope this helps in finding a place to (pretend to) study during RRR Week, and we wish you the very best of luck on your finals.

Note: the Law Library is not open to undergraduates during Finals period.

Morrison Library – Eunice Choi

Morrison

Morrison

  • A quietness that isn’t intimidating like Main Stacks but instead allows people to fully focus on their reading/work.
  • A nice view of Morrison.

    A nice view of Morrison.

  • Extremely comfortable, squishy couches and seats of various kinds that make reading a read more »

We’re back with another detailed infographic to illustrate a fascinating social trend that can be observed of many Berkeley undergraduate students, and is ultimately responsible for subpar library selection – stutentus dysfunctionus. This week’s productivity chart, organized from a compilation of various scientific data on library location amenities, aims to support study habits by streamlining study location options available to students. Why are you still reading this?

Click to expand.

Click to expand.

If you’re so dysfunctional to need to use the above chart, you probably won’t benefit this late in the semester… So we hope that you’ll at least feel more productive with the help of this graphic. Happy procrastinating! read more »


Finding a place to study on this vast campus for a newly arrived freshman (or even for some that have already spent some time here) can be a daunting task. There are so many options, and today we’d like to give you some insight into just some of the places that you can sleep study all night long.

1. Main Stacks – Daniel Radding

Main Stacks is that way.
Main Stacks is that way.

In hindsight, we probably should not have sent one of our cub writers to Main Stacks, because it is really easy to get lost down there if you don’t know what you’re doing. Main Stacks is a HUGE library. To give you a sense of its size, consider this: You can enter from Doe and exit from Moffitt. There are four floors total (though you can only study on the lower three) with 400 seats available for individual study. Main Stacks offers a large variety of study environments, which we’re going to break down for you.

This has recently been dubbed the Hallway of Doom.

This has recently been dubbed the Hallway of Doom.

Standing Desks

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Yes, we all know exam time is full of stress, and for a lot of us that can translate to a bad mood, procrastination, or less-than-ideal habits… but you don’t need to spread that crap around for the rest of us. Here are some ways of struggling through exam week while still saving face — for everyone’s sake!

1. Don’t ask people at the library to watch your stuff “for a second,” and then leave for 3 hours.
No, really, our sphincter muscles are already those of a 90-year-old’s from drinking four cups of Peet’s this morning. We need to pee, so don’t blame us if we take advantage of that precious – but conveniently empty – Nalgene bottle you’ve left us to supervise.

2. Don’t take “study aids” and then proceed to make a huge racket in Main Stacks because you didn’t realize you would be yakked out of your mind.
Last year in Main Stacks we sat next to a girl in a cubicle who had obviously taken a… choice pharmaceutical… and spent several hours throwing books all over the place, scribbling like a maniac, and shaking. Yikes.

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ANGELIC

We are sure that every Cal student has had a moment where they embarrassed themselves in front of their peers on campus. Fell down the stairs in Wheeler? Said something woefully dumb in your discussion section? We’ve all been there.

It’s not all that bad though. A recent UC Berkeley study published online in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology concludes that often feeling embarrassed may be an indicator of good character in an individual. read more »


study

With more than half the semester already over, retaining information for those dreaded finals (or even more midterms) becomes exceedingly difficult for us non-geniuses. Instead of boring you with tips on forming a study group you can find via CollegeBoard via Google, we would like to give our own take on studying in a group. True, some students study better flying solo, but group learning can help retain information in two ways. read more »


Library
We were ready for one of those nights. A Main Stacks night. There were more books in our bag than hours left in the day. There was a caffeinated drink tucked away neatly, waiting to be smuggled in. Yes, we were prepared to disappear into the library until the final “may I have your attention please” blared from the intercom. Sadly, it was not to be.

Our grand plans for the evening evaporating as we clutched the handles of Moffitt’s locked doors in desperation, we at least had the presence of mind to check the calendar so thoughtfully affixed before us. It was exactly as we feared: the library closed at 5 p.m. today, and will closed all day tomorrow. Ugh. How are we supposed to really enjoy our day off without holing ourselves up in a sterile and intellectually draining subterranean study hell for as many hours as sanity permits? read more »


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