6829496615_fcc20fbd92

We at the Clog know inequalities between men and women in the workplace sucks. A new study led by a UC Berkeley psychologist has looked into the issue and found that these obstacles affect women who also run their households more than we thought. (Basically, they have fewer career ambitions.)

Of course, the study also found that men’s ambitions weren’t affected when they were in control of the household.

We have empowered women without the appropriate shift in gender values. As of the 2010 census, more working women over 25 have bachelor’s degrees than men. Yet among the Fortune 500, they hold just 16.6 percent of board seats and just 14.3 percent of executive officer positions, according to an NBC news article. There’s more qualified women, yet they’re underrepresented at the highest positions. What’s the deal? Nothing makes sense.

Out of college, women earn 82 percent of what men earn. Women are just as ambitious and capable as men, but the glass ceiling is real. Our expectations of women have not changed to recognize their capabilities.

“Being in charge of household decisions may bring a semblance of power to women’s traditional role, to the point where women may have less desire to push against the obstacles to achieving additional power outside the home,” said UC Berkeley psychologist Serena Chen in a press release.

In education, we are in 2013; but when it comes to “traditional roles,” we may as well be in the 1960s. read more »